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Drug driving courses may be available to drug drivers in 2017

Drug Driving Courses

Convicted drink drivers are to be educated on drug driving as well as drink driving in newly structured rehabilitation courses.

Convicted drink drivers are to be educated on drug driving as well as drink driving in newly structured rehabilitation courses. Combined drink and drug driving courses could be made available for convicted drug drivers in 2017.

In a bid to help improve road safety, Transport Minister Andrew Jones has announced a new pilot course which will educate convicted drink drivers not only about the dangers of drink driving but the dangers of drug driving as well.

The new pilot courses which started on the 24th October 2016 will see convicted drink drivers who attend a drink driving rehabilitation course be educated about drug driving alongside drink driving.

Drug Driving Courses Possible in 2017?

It is estimated that approximately 1,000 offenders will attend the combined drink and drug driving courses that have been introduced, the education / rehabilitation courses will run until the end of March 2017 after which a consultation will take place to decide whether or not to make the new format courses available to convicted drug drivers as well as to convicted drink drivers.

Currently, only convicted drink drivers may be afforded the opportunity to take the drink driving rehabilitation course. Successfully completing the course within a certain time frame allows offenders to have any period of disqualification imposed reduced by up to 25%. If the new pilot courses prove to be a success, convicted drug drivers could be afforded the same opportunity.

The courses main aim is to educate people in the hope of changing their behaviour and help prevent reoffending.

Andrew Jones, Road Safety Minister stated:

Educating offenders of the dangers of drug driving will help prevent it in the future.”

Since the introduction of new drug driving laws which came into effect on March 2nd 2015 approximately 7,000 convicted drug drivers have been banned compared to only 879 in 2014.

A huge increase which is down to the fact that driving with certain specified controlled drugs in the system which exceed the maximum legal limit has now become a criminal offence, the same way drink driving is.

This, alongside the fact that the police can now use road-side drug tests to detect certain drugs in a persons body has seen a massive increase in people being disqualified for drug driving offences.

You can read more about the addition of drug driving education to existing rehabilitation courses in England and Wales here.